Liverpool progresses trackless tram with Curtin University partnership

Liverpool City Council and Curtin University today announced a joint research partnership in Western Sydney on trackless trams – driverless, rechargeable electric vehicles guided by GPS that can operate at a fraction of the cost of light rail.

Curtin University will undertake world-leading research for Liverpool on the opportunity that trackless trams present as a new form of public transport in Australia.

“We are leading the way when it comes to future thinking. No other local government in Australia is doing this,” Liverpool Mayor Wendy Waller said.

“Western Sydney International (Nancy-Bird Walton) Airport will be a digital airport. We are its gateway city and we need efficient, environmentally friendly transport options to get people to the airport during its construction and operational phases.

“This research partnership will hopefully be the first of many steps towards an innovative rapid transit corridor between the new airport and our CBD.”

Curtin’s research will particularly focus on the potential to link Liverpool’s CBD and the new Western Sydney International (Nancy-Bird Walton) Airport by trackless tram along the Fifteenth Avenue corridor.

The study will look at the steps required to get the technology to Western Sydney and the potential of a trackless tram for high-quality development in this part of Western Sydney.

Curtin University will use Liverpool as a case study for what might be possible with innovative public transport technologies.

The study will be led by world-renowned sustainability expert Professor Peter Newman AO and will draw on cutting-edge research occurring in Australia and around the world.

The study will occur over the next 12 months and represents a critical next step as Liverpool City Council takes the lead on delivering high-quality public transport for Western Sydney.

Liverpool City Council’s aim is to ensure a high-quality, rapid public transport connection for passengers, workers and local residents when the new airport opens in 2026.

With the right technology and careful design, this project has the potential for a 20-minute trip from Liverpool City Centre to the new airport. It will be a powerful transport spine for commuters in Liverpool’s current and emerging suburbs.